My Science Library for preK-2

Six books exploring matter and thermodynamics for preK-2 (Rourke, 2010)

Grades prek-1

What is it Made of?What Is It Made Of?

Children’s Literature review:
“Young students will explore what everyday objects are made of in this colorful and engaging book. Materials of cloth, metal, plastic, wood, and paper are each given a page that correlates to an example and picture of a coat, school bus, table (hard plastic), rain hat (soft plastic), and pencil. The large font and bright pictures, and a total of eighty-seven words, will make beginning readers feel confident. The last page encourages students to apply what they have learned by showing a picture of a playground and asking, “What is it made of?” … This is a good purchase for a curious kindergarten or first grade student interested in basic science. As a teaching tool, the paperback version is reasonably priced and conforms to National Science Education and Teaching standard curriculum.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

Solid or Liquid?Solid or Liquid?

Children’s Literature review:
“Learning about the difference between solid and liquids begins with instructions to “turn on the tap” in this examination of everyday science. By using common examples like milk, a cookie, a chair, and water, children will learn why liquids need a container and solids do not, and that solids hold their own shape. At eighty words, all the language is basic and meant to be an introduction to simple science. All the content is appropriate for a kindergarten or first grader and reflects National Science Teachers Association standards. … As a paperback copy, the low price makes this a reasonable and helpful addition to a classroom. It is part of the “My Science Library” series from Rourke Classroom.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

Grades K-1

Floating SinkingSinking and Floating

Children’s Literature review:
“The principles of buoyancy and density, i.e. what floats and what sinks, are discussed in this easy-to-understand book for elementary school students. Readers will learn that air pockets are a key factor in what can float, as a cork has less than density than water, whereas metal coins will sink. Rated as a Level I, this book is appropriate for first or second grade students. The text reflects National Science Education and Teaching Standards. This is part of the “My Science Library” series from Rourke Classroom. At a low price point for a paperback version, it is a reasonable purchase for a home-school curriculum or for a library.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

 Matter Comes in All ShapesMatter Comes in All Shapes

Children’s Literature review:
“A basic look at the concept of matter is posed in this look at the science around us. Young readers will learn that everything that has mass and a shape is matter. Matter can be a liquid, solid or gas, such as a chair, cookie, water or air. Since energy does not have mass or shape, it is not matter. … The large text, color pictures and easy-to-understand concept make this an appropriate, budget-conscious choice for the elementary classroom or library. The text reflects National Science Education and Teaching Standards. It would be best for a first or second grader, and teachers can follow up with Melting Matter or other books in the “My Science Library” series from Rourke Classroom.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

Grades 1-2

Melting Matter Melting Matter

Children’s Literature review:
“As an introduction to the concept of matter, young readers will learn how all food is made from matter. Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space, and can be a solid, liquid or gas. Matter can change forms, such as the way ice cream may start out in a shape but eventually melts and becomes a liquid. Molecules of solids do not have as much energy as molecules of liquids, the text explains. Other substances, like glass, have to reach a very high temperature before it melts and matter like wood burns rather than melts. The book is essentially the sequel to Matter Comes in All Shapes, and would be appropriate for second or third graders. It compliments other books in the “My Science Library” series from Rourke Publishing, and reflects scientific teaching standards. …This is an excellent, low-cost choice for a classroom.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

 Where did the Water Go?Where Did The Water Go?

Children’s Literature review:
“This look at water is about solids, liquids and water vapors. Elementary students will learn why water changes, i.e. boiling makes it become a gas, and a low temperature changes it into ice. Large colorful pictures of clouds, water molecules, thermometers, icicles and gas enhance the straight-forward text. …With a total of 300 words, the book is appropriate for young readers in second or third grades, although they will need adult guidance understanding the scientific concepts. …The text reflects National Science Education and Teaching Standards. This is part of the “My Science Library” series from Rourke Classroom. At a low price point for a paperback version, it is hard to beat as a resource.” Reviewer: Elizabeth Leis-Newman

 

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